A collection of blogs and musings from the people that work at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum - Florida's Finest Lightstation.

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Of Truth, Earth Day and Creative Conflict

Posted by: Kathy Fleming in

We have recently been giving literally hundreds of school tours at the museum. We have had just tons of wonderful comments back about them, espcially since our resident naturalist, Gail Compton, began to share her Owl Calls and information about the natural environment on and around our 6 acre light station.

We even had an unexpected guest. Hearing Gail's Owl calls on tape, one of our Great Horned Owls showed up and sat in the trees over the children's heads along the path to the lighthouse. What a delight. Here is this Owl in all his majesty calling out to us and looking on. And below are groups of children calling back to him. They were delighted.

You see the natural environment was very much a part of the life of a lighthouse keeper. When we study it we can see how the world has changed and recognize the importance of saving it today. We know that flocks of birds dominated Anastasia Island during the late 19th century to early 20th century. Some of them are still around today.

Studying our enviornment allow us to explore our world and dialog. We don't always agree with each other and this is why museum life and education works for us. It takes community to participate in museum life. We talk about and share and build truth from many disparate sources. Owls are one such source. Children are another. What all these tours and all this fun have made me think about is how we learn and interact with what is true and real in our world. We can save the Earth, only if we love it and care about it and can decide what is really true.


There is a debate raging now on some lighthouse stations between the cultural resoruces managers and the natural resoruces managers. Balance is required and adequate funding for places that have both history and nature. We love and save both our enviorment and the story of our culture. Both are critically important anchors as we move forward as caring citizens and good decision makers. Both help us do the "good work" that connects us to our mission in non-profit life. Both are a piece of a greater truth and seeing the entire truth is very important to good decisions.

When we really connect with something true, something hopeful, something loving, remarkable things happen. Owls show up to say they agree.

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