Category Archives: Daily Operations

For National Pickle Day, Museum announces new name and logo for its treats-on-the-go concept, the Tin Pickle

Chosen from 34 Flagler College design students’ submissions, the Tin Pickle Local Gedunk logo debuts

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. – A winner has been chosen from among thirty-four submissions from Flagler College Professor Natalie Stephenson’s design classes for a new food concept at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum. Lauren Curtis’ torpedo design with nose art will be the logo for the Tin Pickle which is a snack counter in the newly-restored WWII Garage, recently unveiled during the Museum’s Grand Opening in September. The WWII Garage featuring the Tin Pickle Local Gedunk is one of two buildings in the Maritime Heritage Park depicting local WWII history.  The second building in the WWII story is the Barracks for which the Museum is planning a restoration start date in December.  The name was coined the Tin Pickle in early September and a joint project with Professor Stephenson’s class was launched soon after.  As part of the design challenge, the project began with a visit to the Museum and the Tin Pickle to get an idea of setting, food offerings and goals for how the staff wanted to convey the local WWII history through this new food experience.

Museum spokesperson Tonya Creamer said, “We are excited to announce the official name – the Tin Pickle Local Gedunk.  From the outset we knew we wanted it to be a fun, quirky and unique place to grab a bite to eat while visiting the Museum.  The name is WWII slang, as is the tagline, Local Gedunk, meaning local snack counter.  That portion of the name was suggested by our winning student designer, Lauren Curtis.  She and the other students really took our design challenges head on in their design and tagline suggestions.”  The logos were presented to Museum staff, eventually narrowing down the choices to four finalists:  Sean Brunner; Caitlin Lopez; Lauren Curtis; Lisa Schweikert.  In regards to the chosen design, Creamer said, “Lauren’s design really spoke to us and checked off all of our boxes.  It uses the colors from our era buildings, has a 40s personality to it and also introduces to the visitors the Local Gedunk phrase which we hope will encourage conversation between the staff and visitors.”  Curtis has already agreed to continue working with the Museum on further design needs as they develop materials relating to and for the Tin Pickle.

Student design winner Lauren Curtis stands with her logo at the Tin Pickle

Students who participated in the collaboration project shared their thoughts on the process of working with a nonprofit client.  One student, Caitlin Lopez, said, “It was a fun and unique experience to create a logo for this local community business. Having visited the Lighthouse many times in childhood, I was excited to try and create something for them, and interested in the changes that were occurring there. This design also came with many challenges that were fun to try and find a solution for: a tagline, the relationship of the Lighthouse to the eatery, what to call it, the historical context, etc.  In the end, it is satisfying to create something for a local business that needed our help.”

The Tin Pickle is currently undergoing testing for its menu.  It is open to the visiting public during normal Museum operating hours of 9 AM – 5 PM daily.

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ABOUT THE ST. AUGUSTINE LIGHTHOUSE & MARITIME MUSEUM:

A pivotal navigation tool and unique landmark of St. Augustine for over 140 years, the St. Augustine Light Station is host to centuries of history in the Nation’s Oldest Port®. Through interactive exhibits, guided tours and maritime research, the 501(c)(3) nonprofit St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum is on a mission to discover, preserve, present and keep alive the stories of the Nation’s Oldest Port® as symbolized by our working lighthouse. We are the parent organization to the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) and an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. (StAugustineLighthouse.org

WWII Era Maintenance Garage Restoration

On April 5th, the World War II-era garage here on the light station was raised by professional house movers. As part of restoring and maintaining our historic campus, the building will be converted for use as WWII Coast Guard exhibit space and for the Museum’s café. For years, soil built up around the foundation, causing moisture and termite problems that almost completely destroyed the original structural fabric. In 2008, the Museum completed some internal work to sure-up the back wall and installed a new shingle roof using replica 1940s green asphalt shingles. The 2016 work goes far deeper into the structure and it will be made as good as new by the time it re-opens to the public later this year.

The building will sit upon a new foundation slab, approximately one foot higher than the old foundation. This will prevent soil buildup and ensure the integrity of the structure for years to come. After the new foundation is poured, and utilities are installed, the moving company will lower the building onto its new home. There is a lot going on here at the Lighthouse to create new opportunities for our visitors and members and better house our existing programs. You may have noticed the new maintenance building to the south of the Visitors’ Center and the new Maritime Archaeology and Education Center on the north end of the campus. Much of the construction should be done by the middle of the summer and we look forward to opening the new buildings, exhibits, and labs to our community and patrons. Follow our activity here on the blog, on Facebook, and by visiting with us here in beautiful St. Augustine!

Click below to see the video of the raising of the WWII-era Maintenance Garage!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyGYWJIFTSE&feature=youtu.be 

Brendan Burke joined the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum in 2007 as an archaeologist for the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program. He holds a graduate degree in Anthropology from The College of William & Mary.

We’re Ready to Make a Difference in 2017!

The new year arrived with a burst of cold air (Florida winter last three whole days this year, it was tough, but we powered through!) and the promise of exciting things on the horizon.

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Construction has begun on our new Maritime Archaeology & Education Center!

We’ve written before about our new Maritime Archaeology & Education Center, which is finally under construction, but we haven’t shared what this new facility will mean for us in terms of telling the stories of St. Augustine’s connections to World War II. Continue reading

9 Frequently Asked Questions at the Top of the Lighthouse

When you visit us here at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum, you will most likely climb to the top of our famous Lighthouse to enjoy the breathtaking views of our beautiful town. Tourists and locals alike all seem to have the same several questions they ask when they get to the top of the Lighthouse.

1. “What are those giant white tents?”

We know what you’re thinking, no it’s not a circus or fair of any sort. It may look a little different from an aerial view but is in fact the St. Augustine Amphitheater!

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2. “How many stairs did I just climb?”

This question is usually asked with a lot of huffing and puffing involved. There are 219 stairs from the base of the tower to the top with eight landing areas to rest in between. It may sound like a lot, but we promise it’s not that bad and it is totally worth the view!

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3. “How tall is this thing?”

The tower stands tall at 165 feet from the ground. It is 95 feet taller than the Old Spanish Lighthouse. The Lighthouse is the 5th tallest in Florida and is also much wider than most lighthouses. For guests, the highest point you can reach is the gallery deck, which is 140 feet above the ground. Continue reading

Making an Exhibit: Exclusive Sneak Peek!

What does it take to build a brand new museum exhibit? Over the next few months, we’re going to give you exclusive access behind the scenes as our team works together to create Wrecked! a new experience coming to the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum in May 2016.

Read previous posts in the series:

» “Boxes & Beginnings”
» “Moving Ain’t Easy”
» “New Reflections”

Do you want to see something cool?

Psst. Hey you! Yeah, you!

Come close to the screen. I have a secret to share.

All week, our fantastic team of installation experts, creative folks, painters, and designers have been on site unpacking and mounting all of the imaginative pieces that will make up the backbone of our new exhibit.

Are you ready?

Below are the very first images of Wrecked! — which won’t be open to the public for a few more weeks (we still need to add in those all-important shipwreck artifacts and some extra-exciting interactive pieces).

But for now, enjoy this exclusive look at the newest addition to the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum!

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Start your Wrecked! journey on the first floor of the Keepers’ House with this 1:1 scale print of our shipwreck site map with insights into the history behind this American Revolutionary War-era wreck.
Conduct your own magnetometer search of this ocean grid in one of the many hands-on spaces in this new exhibit.
Conduct your own magnetometer search of this ocean grid in one of the many hands-on spaces in this new exhibit. (Notice anything familiar about the stripes on this table?)

Continue reading