Category Archives: Events

Museum will offer free admission to military personnel and their families this summer

ST. AUGUSTINE LIGHTHOUSE & MARITIME MUSEUM TO PARTICIPATE IN BLUE STAR MUSEUMS

ST. AUGUSTINE, FL  – The St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum announces it will join museums nationwide in participating in the tenth summer of Blue Star Museums, a program which provides free admission to our nation’s active-duty military personnel and their families this summer. The 2019 program will begin earlier than in past years, launching on Saturday, May 18, 2019, Armed Forces Day, and ending on Monday, September 2, 2019, Labor Day. Military can find the list of participating museums at arts.gov/bluestarmuseums.

Blue Star Museums is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in collaboration with Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums nationwide. First Lady of the United States Melania Trump and Second Lady of the United States Karen Pence are honorary co-chairs of Blue Star Museums 2019.

Self-guided tours of the St. Augustine Light Station include six historic structures –  the 1874 lighthouse tower, the 1876 keepers’ house, two 1888 summer kitchens, a 1936 garage, and a 1941 United States Coast Guard coastal lookout building.  

The St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum will hold a special event on June 6 for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day which will include special programs in the WWII US Coast Guard exhibit building.   

“The history and mission of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum have a natural appeal for military members and their families, and it is an honor to host them this summer as part of the Blue Star Museums program,” said Capt. Bob Buehn, USN (Ret.), the Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the nonprofit Museum.

“We preserve centuries of military history here in St. Augustine and the lighthouse still serves as a functioning aid to navigation, areas of interest for those in uniform.  The chance for them to visit here with their families at no cost is wonderful.”

The St. Augustine Lighthouse

“The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to celebrate the tenth summer of collaborating with Blue Star Families, Department of Defense, and especially the more than 2,000 museums across our nation that make this program possible,” said Mary Anne Carter, acting chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.

“Organizations such as the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum are providing wonderful opportunities for military families to share a memorable experience together this summer.”

This year’s participating organizations include fine art, science, history, and children’s museums, as well as zoos, aquariums, gardens, and more. Museums are welcome to sign up for Blue Star Museums throughout the summer at arts.gov.

“We’ve seen the tremendous impact the Blue Star Museums program brings to our military families, and we’re thrilled to be celebrating a decade of support,” said Kathy Roth-Douquet, chief executive officer of Blue Star Families. “Not only are museums fun to explore but are also great for making memories and strengthening military families as a whole.”

“The Defense Department congratulates Blue Star Families and the National Endowment for the Arts on reaching an incredible milestone: Ten years of service to the military community though Blue Star Museums,” said A.T. Johnston, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy. “We offer our sincere gratitude to the more than 2,000 museums across the country who open their doors through this wonderful program. Your patriotism and generosity have enriched the lives and experiences of our military families.”

1941 US Coast Guard Coastal Lookout Quarters on the grounds of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum.

The free admission program is available for those currently serving in the United States Military — Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard as well as members of the Reserves, National Guard, U.S. Public Health Commissioned Corps, NOAA Commissioned Corps, and up to five family members. Qualified members must show a Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), DD Form 1173 ID card (dependent ID), or a DD Form 1173-1 ID card for entrance into a participating Blue Star Museum.

Follow Blue Star Museums on Twitter @NEAarts and @BlueStarFamily, #bluestarmuseums.

About St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum

A defensive and navigation tool and landmark of St. Augustine for 145 years, the St. Augustine Light Station watches over the waters of the Nation’s Oldest Port®. Through interactive exhibits, guided tours and maritime research, the 501(c)(3) nonprofit St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum, Inc. is on a mission to discover, preserve, present and keep alive the stories of the Nation’s Oldest Port® as symbolized by our working lighthouse. We are the parent organization to the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) and an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. (StAugustineLighthouse.org)

About the National Endowment for the Arts

Established by Congress in 1965, the National Endowment for the Arts is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the Arts Endowment supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Visit arts.gov to learn more.

About Blue Star Families
Blue Star Families builds communities that support military families by connecting research and data to programs and solutions, including career development tools, local community events for families, and caregiver support. Since its inception in 2009, Blue Star Families has engaged tens of thousands of volunteers and serves more than 1.5 million military family members. With Blue Star Families, military families can find answers to their challenges anywhere they are. For more information, visit bluestarfam.org

Ghost Tour Experience: ‘Each floor held new secrets about the history of the Keepers’ House.’

The St. Augustine Lighthouse shown on October 31, 2018 during a Dark of the Moon Ghost Tour. Photo by Jayda Barnes

By Jayda Barnes, Flagler College student

The first thing I noticed about the Dark of the Moon Tour was that it was, indeed, very dark. The chill in the air may have been due to the setting sun or the spookiness of Halloween night. The Museum grounds, usually bright with sunlight, faded into the shadows of the trees which hovered around it. The only true source of light appeared in the beacon of its namesake: The Lighthouse.

After receiving my tickets, I rented an EMF meter to sense the electromagnetic fluctuations caused by any ghosts, mostly because I knew my best friend would glare at me all night if I didn’t.

The occasion of the evening only became more apparent as we stood outside of the Museum gift shop, waiting to be led on our spooky journey. Halloween shirts and costumes popped up sporadically in a few of the more festive guests. Promptly at 7:30 pm, our party was escorted to the base of the tower, where we learned the rules for the evening and split into groups. My group entered the Lighthouse first. We stood at the bottom of the tower and listened to the stories of ghosts seen in the past, especially the mysterious Shadow Figure who has been seen peering over the railing down at guests.

Perhaps the scariest moment of the evening came as we huffed our way up the 219 steps to the top of the Lighthouse. The exercise of it was frightening enough, but on top of that, the entire tower was shrouded in darkness, save for the few lanterns dangling along the way. Silhouetted figures painted on the walls of each landing invoked images of the Shadow Figure we’d just been told about.

Despite the fear and the height, everyone made it to the top and embraced the whipping chill of the wind. All of St. Augustine stretched below, hundreds of tiny lights peppering the ground. It was almost beautiful enough to make me forget the ghost story I was standing on.

Once the heat of the climb wore off and the wind became more chilling than relieving, the group made its way back down to the ground. Our guide led us around to the side of the Lighthouse, where she detailed the haunting tale of one Lightkeeper’s plummet from the original tower.

After catching our breath, we journeyed to the Keepers’ House. Stories of fatal accidents and irritable Lightkeepers filled the darkness. Each floor held new secrets about the history of the Keepers’ House. We ended in the basement, where we were released to explore on our own for the rest of the night.

The basement had the most activity of the evening. One man sat in one of the resident ghost’s favorite chairs. As the guest spoke to the room, EMF meters began lighting up red around his shoulders, indicating some paranormal activity. The more we spoke and scanned the room, the more lights lit up, travelling behind the chairs to the back of the room. Upstairs, we explored an area called the Shadow Room, where the energy of the room intensified as soon as we entered. My friend heard beeping in the corner as we searched the room for signs of ghostly activity.

The tour ended at 9:30 p.m., sending us back into the world to reflect on our supernatural experiences. Even with the Lighthouse looming behind us, we carried the eeriness with us into the festive evening. The tour might have been even spookier because of Halloween, but it was also even more fun because of it. As our guide told us, the Museum is “not a haunted house, just haunted.” And on Halloween, when the spiritual veil is said to be thinnest, it’s always possible the ghosts will make a special appearance, just for you.

Archaeologist Brendan Burke speaks about Maritime Traditions in Tarpon Springs

On September 20, the City of Tarpon Springs Heritage Museum opened a new exhibit on Greek Maritime Traditions at their beautiful facility located on the banks of Springs Bayou, a true Florida gem.

Brendan Burke, Associate Director of Archaeology for the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum was asked to provide a keynote presentation on Greek boat building impacts throughout Florida to open the exhibit.

 

The City of Tarpon Springs and Brendan Burke, guest speaker, were honored with the presence of Mr. Dmitris Sparos, Consul General for the Hellenic Republic of Greece. Mr. Sparos has also served as Consul General for Greece at The Hague, Peru, the Middle East, and as Directorate for Russia and the Balkans. A natural polyglot, he speaks five languages fluently and was kind to help Brendan refine his pronunciation of a few Greek words used in the presentation. Sparos and Burke are joined by Wally Ericson, master boat builder in Tarpon Springs and Tina Bucuvalas, Curator of Arts & Historical Resources for the City of Tarpon Springs. For those of you not having visited Tarpon Springs, you must! It is an amazing community of Greek diasporans who maintain their cultural affiliation as Greek very strongly. Of course, their tradition as a sponging capital couples naturally with St. Augustine’s role as a fishing and boat building port, indeed sometimes linked by blood! It was a wonderful experience, well attended by the community, and we wish the City the best with their new and important exhibit.

Mrs. Ourania Stephanides approached me after the presentation with an amazing tale, she is the 4th great-granddaughter of Hezekiah H. Pittee, Superintendent of Lighthouse Construction during the 1870s. Pittee oversaw construction of the St. Augustine Lighthouse from June of 1872-October, 1874. It was amazing to connect with her, what a marvelous coincidence!

Mrs. Coutroulis, pictured here with Brendan, was a special guest to the opening of the exhibit on Greek fishing heritage in Tarpon Springs. Her family built boats in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, primarily shrimp boats, and she brought pictures from their decades of experience.

 

Full Sturgeon Moon this weekend

Climb to the top of the Lighthouse AT NIGHT by the glow of lanterns… and the FULL MOON! Dark of the Moon Ghost Tours this week:
  • 8:30-10:30 PM Friday, August 24
  • 8:30-10:30 PM Saturday, August 25
  • 9:30-11:30 PM Sunday, August 26 (Full Sturgeon Moon – read description below!)
TICKETS & UPCOMING DATES: staugustinelighthouse.org
More about the Full Sturgeon Moon from mlive.com

 

This weekend’s moon is summer’s last big show of the season, with the Sturgeon Moon set to become officially full just before 8 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 26.

This means both Saturday’s and Sunday’s moonrises will be a treat, if skies are clear.

The August moon is traditionally called the Sturgeon Moon because this type of fish can be a good catch in late summer and September, according to Space.com.

In Michigan, the ancient-looking lake sturgeon are a threatened fish and are caught only sparingly, according to strict guidelines. Volunteers each spring stand guard over their spawning rivers to protect the fish from poachers.

But not all groups use the Sturgeon name for the last summer moon.

Here’s what Space.com has to say about what other people call this moon:

“The Ojibwa — who lived in what is now southeastern Canada, near the Great Lakes — referred to the eighth moon of the year as the Blackberry Moon, which could also occur in July. The August full moon — the ninth full moon of the year — was called the Corn Moon by peoples in northeastern North America, per the Old Farmer’s Almanac.

 

 

 

 

Anastasia Sailing

The day dawned bright and beautiful. And it had been a long-awaited day. The Florida skipjack, Anastasia, which was built at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum’s

Volunteer boat builders get her rigging ready as they launch out.

Heritage Boatworks, launched in July. She was christened with the name of the island she was built on. Her first sailing sea trial, delayed by the construction and opening of our new Maritime Archaeology & Education Center, took place the morning of February 7, 2018. Like many of St. Augustine’s historic working watercraft, the Florida skipjack’s origins are elsewhere. The vessel type originated in the nineteenth-century as a working watercraft on Long Island Sound. They were used there in the oyster business and other fisheries. The craft type was brought to Florida by Captain Watrous, possibly a local pronunciation of Waterhouse, who arrived in the Jacksonville area from Essex on the Connecticut River on Long Island Sound in about 1850.

Watrous built and introduced the type to the St. Johns River and the surrounding coastal waters, including St. Augustine, where they became a common sight on the waterfront. These craft were used in the local shad fishing industry, which typically ran from January through March. Working Florida skipjacks supplied the distant markets of New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia and more distant inland cities with catches which were first transshipped to Savannah and from there they continued by rail. In the off-season, Florida’s skipjacks were also used to haul local cargoes such as oranges.

St. Augustine skipjack docked on the bayfront of St. Augustine. Photo courtesy of St. Augustine Historical Society.

Our craft, Anastasia, is a faithful replica of one of these historic watercraft. The original skipjack, upon which ours is based, was built between 1875 and 1880 by a boat carpenter named McCabe on Dunns Creek in the vicinity of Jacksonville. The craft was documented and drawn in 1936 during the Great Depression by members of a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project called the Historic American Merchant Marine Survey. Her construction plans (twenty pages of field notes with measured drawings) and photos all correspond to Survey 8-46. This information was used to build a faithful replica of the original.

Anastasia sailing on February 7th.

Anastasia sails like a dream! She is fast and very responsive to the helm. She points very close to the wind and goes about with ease.  She is a beautiful craft! A few adjustments to her rig will be made before she returns to the water next week. Look for her on the bayfront. She will be flying the Lighthouse pennant!

Contributed by Director of Heritage Boat Works Dr. Sam Turner, edited by Student Intern Jayda Barnes